Archive for health and wellness

Is ‘good’ cholesterol actually bad?

Remember when we learned that hormone replacement therapy might harm—rather than help—postmenopausal women?  Or when the new PSA testing guidelines turned conventional wisdom on its head?  Remember the droves of anxious patients who worried that they had been mistreated, overtreated, or misled?  Read more

Taking the Patient Into Consideration

I just read a very thought-provoking article in a recent New England Journal of Medicine that discussed the concept of goal-oriented patient care. Read more

National Public Health Week

This week is National Public Health Week.  Start small, think big: We can make it happen! Read more

The Patients Have Spoken…

In overwhelming numbers, patients express interest in exploring the notes that their primary doctors write about them after an office visit, but doctors worry about the impact of such transparency on their patients and on their own workflow, according to a study just published in the Annals of Internal Medicine. Read more

Social Barriers Impact Health, Too

An on-line survey of 1000 primary care physicians suggests that social barriers–such as a lack of access to basic housing, transportation, and nutritious foods–can impact patient health as much as access to direct medical care.  The survey was conducted in September and October 2011 on behalf of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.   Read more

Linking Insurance Premiums to Wages

A recent article in the Washington Post describes an interesting scenario, whereby health insurance premiums within a company are linked to workers' wages.

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‘Tis the Season…To Acknowledge the Hungry

Last year, 17.2 million households in the United States were food insecure, the highest level on record, as the Great Recession continued to wreak havoc on families across the country. Of those 17.2 million households, 3.9 million included children.  Here’s a look at hunger in America, as millions of Americans struggle to get enough to eat in the wake of the economic crisis: Read more

Do We Really Need to Screen All Children for High Cholesterol?

An expert panel has recently recommended that all children, regardless of family history, undergo universal screening for elevated cholesterol levels. The panel recommends that adolescents undergo lipid screening for non-fasting non-HDL-cholesterol levels or a fasting lipid panel between the ages of 9 and 11 years followed by another full lipid screening test between 18 and 21 years of age. Read more

An Ounce of Prevention….Maybe.

A new study published in Health Affairs predicts that Medicare could save close to $7 billion over 13 years by offering weight management and lifestyle classes to people with prediabetes in the 5 years before they become eligible for Medicare.    But wait…! Read more

The Health Benefits of Volunteerism

“I”m too busy to volunteer.”   “I’ve got too many other things to do.”  But what if volunteering was actually good for your health? Read more